8th Biannual Utah Crime, Justice, and Equity Student Conference – April 26, 2024 – SLCC Miller Campus, PSET Building, 2nd Floor, Parking is Free

8th Biannual
Utah Crime, Justice, and Equity Student Conference

Friday, April 26, 2024
10am to 4:00pm

Salt Lake Community College, Larry Miller Campus
Public, Safety, Education and Training Center (PSET) Building
2nd Floor

Address:
9750 South 300 West. Sandy, UT, 84070
Parking is Free.

Free. Public. and Family Friendly.

Calling Utah undergraduate and graduate students
submit proposals to present or have posters here:
https://forms.office.com/r/bSFYptTx1r

Deadline for submissions is April 1, 2024

Panel Room 1: 211
Panel Room 2: 215
Panel Room 3: 217
Panel Room 4: 278
Lunch and Awards Room: 262
Keynote Room: 276
Posters: Elevator Hall
Agency and Organizations’ Booths Room: 207

The Biannual Utah Crime, Justice, and Equity Conference is open to all undergraduate and graduate students in Utah to present within the field of justice studies, criminology, criminal justice, peace studies, and conflict studies. The purpose of this conference is to promote — scholarship, respect, community engagement, intellectual discovery, research, networking, collaboration, learning, innovation, inclusion, and a more educated democratic citizenship for a peaceful world.

SCHEDULE
(Based on USA Mountain Time)
10:00am – 4:00pm

10:00am-10:10am – Welcoming and Introduction
Room: Cecile Delozier, Associate Dean, Institute for Public Safety, Salt Lake Community College

SESSION ONE
10:10am – 11:15am

ROOM ONE:
Chair: Associate Professor, Chris Bertram

Presenter One
Title: Treatment Towards Non-Human animals within law enforcement
Presenter: Alex Chrisco
Biography: Alex Chrisco is a current Salt Lake Community College student majoring in criminal justice and a member of the Utah Criminology Student Association. He hopes to be an arson investigator in San Deigo, California. Alex was born in Fort Worth, Texas, and moved throughout several states including California, Colorado, Nevada, and Utah because of his family’s involvement within the U.S. military. Currently, he lives in Herriman, Utah, and has volunteered to give out socks to the homeless community. In his free time, he enjoys being outdoors going hiking, surfing, and rock
climbing.
Abstract: This paper is focused on the poor treatment of police K9s and police horses by their handlers in
the United States. Non-human animals have served and continue to serve vital roles in law
enforcement. Poor treatment is the abuse as well as the neglect towards non-human animals
within law enforcement. Many cases within this issue go unnoticed and the ones that do go
noticed are not dealt with responsibility.

Presenter Two
Title: The Struggles of Veterans
Presenter: Renee Smith
Biography: Renee Smith is currently a student at Salt Lake Community College and is majoring in criminal justice. She is going into forensic pathology and is aiming to become a medical examiner. While
Renee was born in Florida, her family moved to Utah when she was 3 so she grew up in
Herriman. She enjoys reading books and volunteering at homeless shelters, she also likes to help
her younger sisters with school whenever they need it.
Abstract: This paper is focused on the struggles of veterans post service and why they happen. This paper
talks about the difficulties like homelessness and substance use that veterans can go through.
Most of this talks about the mental states of veterans and how poor mental and physical health
can cause problems in life. That many veterans turn to crime or commit suicide, drugs and
unshelteredness are concerns that need to be delt with. It talks about how the people who have
served our country are now suffering because of it. This paper informs about statistics around
veterans and that more should be done to help. This paper concludes that more needs to be done
to help those that have served our country.

Presenter Three
Title: Alternatives to Incarceration
Presenter: Dallin Nichols
Biography: Dallin Nichols is a current student at Salt Lake Community College majoring in Criminal Justice
and a member of the Utah Criminology Student Association. He hopes to become a police officer
in Salt Lake City, Utah. Dallin grew up in Tooele, Utah, and moved to South Jordan, Utah when
he was ten years old with his family for career opportunities. Dallin volunteers in his community
by giving socks and necessities to those who are unsheltered. Dallin in his free time enjoys
swimming, being active in community events, and reading when possible; while still finding
time for friends and family.
Abstract: This paper is focused on alternative ways of incarceration, as well as rehabilitation efforts that
can be made. In the document below statistics, real-world events, and possible plans for
adjustment have been stated. This paper argues for a change or alternatives to modern way of
incarceration and housing. This paper highlights alternative thoughts and ideas for reforming
detention facilities. Finally, this paper concludes with calls for helping communities to expand
and eventually release those in need.

Presenter Four
Title: The lack of medical care inside the U.S. prison systems
Presenter: Haylie Ramirez
Biography: Haylie Ramirez is currently a student at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC) majoring in criminal justice. Her career goal is to become a field technician or homicide detective. She was born in Wutzburg, Germany, but moved to South Jordan, Utah at the age of four, because of her father’s honorable discharge from the U.S. military. While attending SLCC she volunteers with the community by giving socks, food, and all the necessities to people in need. In her free time, Haylie enjoys taking her two dogs on walks and playing volleyball with a few of her friends twice a week.
Abstract: This paper delves into the sad realities of the United States prison system, a different world often hidden from mainstream society yet full with despair and neglect. Through a deeply personal interview with the author’s recently incarcerated uncle, Anthony, supplemented by insights from criminal justice coursework, the paper sheds light on the dehumanizing conditions faced by inmates. The firsthand accounts talked about reveals the inadequate medical care, unsanitary living conditions, and pervasive hopelessness of life behind bars. The paper also confronts the systemic failures of law enforcement and prison authorities, highlighting their neglect in addressing the physical and psychological needs of an aging prison population. Moreover, statistical data on inmate mortality rates underscores the urgent need for reform within the prison system. Ultimately, the paper advocates for greater awareness and active engagement in addressing these injustices, emphasizing the potential for positive change through education and advocacy efforts.

Presenter Five
Title:
Presenter: Stevie Youngerman
Biography:
Abstract:

Q and A

ROOM TWO:
Chair: Associate Professor, Brett Terpstra

Presenter One
Title: Environmental Effects due to Poaching
Presenter: Hero Sargent
Biography: Hero Sargent is a current student at Salt Lake Community College majoring in Health Sciences.
Her goal is to get an Associate of Science degree and get certified as a Radiology Technician.
She hopes to continue her education while working. Currently, she is working at a chiropractic
office, and enjoys visual arts and reading during downtime.
Abstract: This paper is on poaching, focused on what it is, why it happens, and the effects that transpire
because of it. This paper argues that poaching is a complex issue, with incentives behind it that
have cultural importance, making it difficult to cease. It highlights the negative and even
unknown effects on animal populations that would negatively harm the world’s ecosystem. This
paper concludes reasoning for poaching and a newer focus to potentially change the social issue
for the better.

Presenter Two
Title: Discrimination Against Trans People
Presenter: Mackenzie Escobedo
Biography: Mackenzie Escobedo goes to Salt Lake Community college and hopes to major in art and to one day be an freelance artist. Mackenzie moved to Utah from Texas away from almost all of their family. Mackenzie really enjoys being there for people who choose to love and care for them as a person.
Abstract: This paper is focused on the discrimination and prejudice within the U.S. criminal justice system related to trans gendered people who live in the U.S specifically I want this paper to focus on the case and news surrounding the topic of Bradon Teena who was a trans gendered man who was a victim of brutal crimes and sexual assault.

Presenter Three
Title: The Effect of “Bad” Science in the Criminal Justice System
Presenter: Matan Siporin
Biography: Matan Siporin is a student currently attending Salt Lake Community College majoring in Chemical Engineering. His goal is to work at either Huntsman Cancer Institute or Associated Regional and University Pathologists inc. (ARUP Laboratories) in Salt Lake City, Utah. Matan was born and raised in Salt Lake City, he enjoys learning new things and taking pictures outdoors. Matan volunteers at Huntsman Cancer Institute a few times a year as well as volunteering with the National Charity League.
Abstract: This paper reviews the faults with eyewitness testimony and how it isn’t as foolproof as people
once thought. The addition of DNA testing in criminal cases has exonerated hundreds of people and this paper reviews a few examples of cases who were sentenced purely from eyewitness testimony. It also reviews reasons why memory (even in groups) can’t always be trusted and shouldn’t be taken as absolute fact. The essay talks about the two major factors that influence misidentification in eyewitness testimony.

Presenter Four
Title:
Presenter: Marnely Rivera
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Five
Title:
Presenter: Jaxxin Schmitt
Biography:
Abstract:

Q and A

ROOM THREE:
Chair: Professor David Robles

Presenter One
Title: Comparative analysis of crime between border and inner cities
Presenter: Camilla Cloward
Biography: Camilla Cloward is a student at Salt Lake Community College. She is studying political science and arabic. She graduates this semester with her associates, than transfers to the University of Utah to get her degree. Her goal from there is to work on an anti-human trafficking taskforce.
Abstract: This presentation is on crime near the Canada and Mexico border. It will compare crime rates in El Paso, Detroit, and Springfield. In this presentation it compares data on crime from these border and inner state cities.

Presenter Two
Title:
Presenter: Carla Perez Atencio
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Three
Title: Where does crime root from?
Presenter: Genero Garcia Navarro
Biography: Genaro is a student attending SLCC majoring in Criminal Justice with an associates of science. He was born in Michoacan, Mexico but lived his whole life here in the USA. His goals are too one day be able to own his own home on a plot of land. Also having a good job as a forensic anthropology.
Abstract: The presentation will go threw and talk about possible ways crime can root from. A topic this presentation will talk about it how poverty could root to crime. Another possible root of crime would be mental health. These are only two of the total topics that will be presented in this slide show.

Presenter Four
Title: Media involvement and perceptions in violent crimes
Presenter: Velia Montoya
Biography: Velia Montoya is a biology student at Salt Lake Community College with hopes to further her education and study forensic sciences. By taking this criminology class, Velia hopes to gain a better understanding of crime as well as a wider more educated approach to it’s causes and solutions. She hopes that her career will garner more success as she broadens her horizons with a variety of topics pertaining to criminal justice. Velia hopes that her interests in both criminal justice and science will make a difference in this world but more importantly, in her community as well, she hopes her knowledge of the causes of crime will help her introduce changes to prevent it in her local communities.
Abstract: This presentation is about the perceptions formed by the media in response to reported violent crimes, and it’s involvement in perpetuating false and unsupported evidence in regards to the causes of crime. This presentation hopes to explain how public reactions in it’s initial stages can be damaging to the process of justice and the prevention of future violent crimes such as sexual assaults, child abuse, school shootings and other such crimes relating to gun violence, and murder. This presentation will be looking at the causes of these falsehoods within the media, the wide reaching impact it holds in regards to the public observations and opinions, and the effects of these reports on the criminal justice system and society as a whole.

Presenter Five
Title: Routine Activity in Child Abuse
Presenter: Kayla Schexnayder-Long
Biography: Kayla Schexnayder-Long. High school graduate of 2022 from Olympus high, 19 years old and a sophomore at SLCC majoring in criminal justice. Currently a golf teaching professional for Salt Lake City golf division, an assistant golf instructor for the golf classes at SLCC and the U of U, and a golf instructor for slc golf divisions pga juniors golf summer classes. Goals are to graduate with an associates degree, go to UVU for a bachelors program, and to attend law school to become a criminal law attorney.
Abstract: This presentation will discuss all areas that are considered child abuse. It will define child abuse, along with defining what routine activity theory is. It will discuss what routine activity theory is typically used for, and where it is used. The presentation will then talk about when routine activity theory has been implemented into child abuse cases. There will then be research and academic based suggestions on how routine activity theory can be used more in an attempt to be more aware of, and further prevent child abuse within areas, places, or communities where the abuse rates are higher.

Q and A

Virtual Room (Forensic Sciences): Innocence Projects: The Devastating Implications of Wrongful Convictions [9:00am-12:00pm]
Chair: TBD, Assistant Professor, Salt Lake Community College (SLCC)

Presenter One [9:00am-9:15am]
Title:
Presenter: Parker Canning
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Two [9:20am-9:35am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Anthony Porter
Presenter: Hadeer Abdulrahman
Biography: Hadeer is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Hadeer aspires to become a lawyer specializing in either real estate or corporate and intends to transfer to the University of Utah in the fall to complete their B.A. in Pre-Law.
Abstract: Anthony Porter was wrongfully convicted of murder and was sentenced to death on August 15, 1983, in Illinois. He served 16 years on death row due to ineffective legal representation, false eyewitness testimony, and police misconduct. Thankfully, he was exonerated in 1999 after investigation by the Northwestern University Medill Innocence Project revealed evidence of his innocence. The real perpetrator has yet to be identified. It is important to learn about this case and take action to prevent such miscarriages of justice going forward to ensure that innocent people are not wrongly convicted and sentenced.

Presenter Three [9:40am-9:55am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: The Central Park Five: Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Yusef Salaam, Antron McCray, and Raymond Santana
Presenter: Audry Cayama Rodriguez
Biography: Audry Cayama is a Criminal Justice Major in their junior year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Audry aspires to become a lawyer and transferred to the University of Utah in the fall of 2023 to complete their B.S. in Criminology.
Abstract: Korey Wise, Kevin Richardson, Yusef Salaam, Antron McCray, and Raymond Santana were wrongfully convicted of sexual abuse, assault, rape, attempted murder, rape, sodomy, and robbery and they were sentenced from 5 to 15 year on August 18 and December 11 of 1990 in New York. They served 35 years due to the following contributing causes: lack of evidence and coerced confession tapes. Thankfully they were exonerated in 2002 after the real perpetrator came forward and was identified. Understanding the significance of the Central Park Jogger case or alternatively known as the Central Park Five due to the implications on the five teenage boys charged with the brutal assault of a New York women, is important. Five teenage boys were wrongfully convicted of crime, following an unfair and racially biased investigations. Understanding the impact this case had on society is important in order to fix the mistakes that were made in the past as well as protect those interacting with the criminal justice system presently and in the future. 

Presenter Four [10:00am-10:15am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Bennie Starks
Presenter: Manuel Dominguez
Biography: Manuel Dominguez is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Manuel aspires to become a law enforcement officer and intends to transfer to Utah Valley University (UVU) in Spring 2025 to complete their B.S. in Criminal Justice.
Abstract: Bennie Starks was wrongfully convicted of assault, resisting, and sexual abuse and was sentenced to 27 years on September 26,1986 in Illinois. They served this sentence due to tampered evidence. Thankfully they were exonerated, but the real perpetrator has yet to be identified. It is important to learn about this case to bring awareness to this nationwide issue. We need to take action and prevent this from happening because it is unjustified, and we are taking years off of people’s lives that did not do the crime.

Presenter Five [10:20am-10:35am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Anthony Porter
Presenter: Aaron Faisal
Biography: Aaron Faisal is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Aaron aspires to become a Detective and intends to transfer to Weber State next summer to complete their B.A. in Criminal Justice.
Abstract: Anthony Porter was wrongfully convicted of two murders and was sentenced to life sentenced in 1982 in Chicago. They served 17 years due to the following contributing causes: eyewitness mis-identification, coerced confessions, and inadequate legal representation.. Thankfully they were exonerated by forensics DNA. The real perpetrator Alsytery Simon was identified. Studying cases like Anthony Porter’s wrongful conviction and Alstory Simon’s exoneration highlights legal system flaws. It emphasizes the need for fair trials, reliable evidence, and competent legal representation. Advocating for reforms is essential to prevent future injustices and ensure a fairer criminal justice system.

Presenter Six [10:40am-10:55am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Marvin Lamont Anderson
Presenter: Alondra Gonzalez
Biography: Alondra Gonzalez is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Alondra intends to transfer to Utah Valley University (UVU) next Fall 2024 to complete their B.S. in Criminal Justice.
Abstract: Marvin Lamont Anderson was wrongfully convicted of sodomy, abduction, robbery, and 2 counts of rape and was sentenced to 210 years in 1982 in the state of Virginia. They served 15 years in prison and 4 years on parole due to the following contributing causes: eye witness misidentification, having an inadequate defense, and government misconduct. Thankfully they were exonerated by DNA. The real perpetrator was identified as John Ottis Lincoln. Learning about cases like this, gives us the knowledge to prevent others having their freedom taken from them. His case serves as a reminder of the necessity for more DNA testing and the need for legal mechanisms to review and address wrongful convictions effectively. Without the statute that the state of Virginia had passed, VA Code Sec. 19.2-327.1 , Marvin would have still been incarcerated and the real perpetrator would have still been free to re-offend. Marvin Lamont Anderson is another example of an individual who fought to prove their innocence despite facing overwhelming odds even when released on parole.

Presenter Seven [11:00am-11:15am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Frederick Clay
Presenter: Hannah Park
Biography: Hannah Park is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Hannah aspires to become a Forensic Psychologist and intends to transfer to the University of Utah this summer to complete their B.S. in Criminology and Psychology.
Abstract: Frederick Clay was wrongfully convicted of murder and was sentenced to life in 1981 in Massachusetts. They served 38 years due to the following contributing causes: eye-witnesses misidentification and hypnosis testimony and evidence. Thankfully they were exonerated by evidence on who shot the victim and misconduct of the police. The real perpetrator has yet to be identified. It is important to learn about this case because we can see that using hypnosis and other hypnotic-related practices is not reliable and should not be admissible. As for eyewitnesses, if the legal system wants to minimize any errors, then law enforcement has to identify and implement recommended best practices.

Presenter Eight [11:20am-11:35am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Dennis Williams
Presenter: Katie Sullivan
Biography: Katie is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Katie aspires to become a Criminologist and intends to transfer to Utah Valley University (UVU) next Fall 2024 to complete their B.S. in Criminal Justice and Sociology.
Abstract: Dennis Williams was wrongfully convicted of rape, murder, and kidnapping and was sentenced to death on October 20, 1978 in Illinois. He served 18 years due to the following contributing causes: false witness testimony, police misconduct, false forensic testimony, ineffective counsel, and prosecutorial misconduct. Thankfully they were exonerated after journalism students uncovered witness statements that indicated the real perpetrators, and DNA evidence. The real perpetrators were Dennis Johnson, Ira Johnson, Juan Rodriguez, and Arthur Robinson. This case is important to learn about because five people were wrongfully convicted and sent to prison, two of whom received the death penalty. Dennis Williams spent 18 years of his life wrongfully convicted behind bars awaiting death. This case has been brought up in Illinois moratorium by Governor George Ryan on the state’s death penalty in 2000 citing the Ford Heights Four as reasoning to remove the death penalty as a punishment.

Presenter Nine [11:40am-11:55am]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Alejandro Hernandez
Presenter: Lydia Vogel
Biography: Lydia is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Lydia aspires to become a Police Officer and intends to transfer to Utah Valley University (UVU) next semester to complete their B.S in Criminal Justice.
Abstract: Alejandro Hernandez was convicted of murder, rape, kidnapping, and home invasion in 1985 in Illinois. He served 10 years due to the following contributing causes: false confessions or admissions, government misconduct, and unvalidated or improper forensic science. While the real perpetrator has finally been identified, it is important to learn about such cases of innocence people because it verifies that we need criminal justice reform.

*Q and A after each 15 min. student presentation

11:15am – 11:20am – Break

SESSION TWO
11:20am – 12:25pm

ROOM ONE:
Chair: Associate Professor, Chris Bertram

Presenter One
Title: Human Trafficking
Presenter: Lesly Medrano-Gonzalez
Biography: Lesly Medrano Gonzalez was born in El Salvador. She has been raised in Utah Since the
age of six. Currently a student at Salt Lake Community College. Majoring in criminal justice.
After getting a degree in criminal justice, I would like to be a victim advocate officer to help
victims or get into the law enforcement academy. Lesly enjoys reading articles and news about
crimes and how investigation is going, also enjoy going into the court and taking notes about
trials. She also volunteers in the community giving socks to the homeless and shelters.
Abstract: Human trafficking, also known as trafficking in persons, or modern-day slavery, is a
multibillion-dollar industry that consumes millions of individuals from diverse social, cultural.
Racial, national, or gender background. Human trafficking can take many forms; labor, organ,
and sex trafficking. It is a crime where people are treated as objects, goods, and commodities,
becoming subjects to mental and physical abuse. To this day, women and children are ones
receiving the most attention when talking about crime, for men are neglected and overlooked due
to socially constructed gender roles.

Presenter Two
Title: Racism & Classism Behind Drug Courts
Presenter: Mackenzie Bennet
Biography: Kenzie Bennet was born in Stamford, Connecticut on September 28, 2004. She is
currently a student at Salt Lake Community College studying criminal justice. After graduating
with a bachelor’s degree, Kenzie plans to go to law school and pursue a career as a public
defense attorney. She does volunteer work by giving socks and hygiene products to the homeless
with my class and enjoys connecting with her community. In Kenzies free time she enjoys doing
outdoor activities as well as traveling and going out with her friends, but she finds pleasure alone
as well.
Abstract: A study by the Department of Justice shows that 84% of drug court graduates were not
re-arrested or charged within the first year of them graduating. In the late 1980s, incarceration
establishments began to overcrowd with individuals who received a sentence due to a drug
charge or offense. In the 2000s, out of the white individuals who attended drug courts in
Missouri, 55% graduated. Out of all the Black individuals who were offered drug courts, 28%
graduated.

Presenter Three
Title:
Presenter: Kylee Hermeling
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Four
Title: Hate Crimes in the Military
Presenter: Nina Begue
Biography: Nina Bugue is a trans student at Salt Lake Community College majoring in History. She hopes to become a history teacher in Utah. Nina grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah but Nina loved to be outdoors and enjoying going for walks and skiing with her family. She did a lot of volunteers work you her teacher from going to the food bank to carpooling with her class members to handing out shocks to people who are unsheltered, but Nina is someone who wants to be part of the Community.
Abstract: This paper is focused on Hate Crimes in the military and how it is mostly overlooked. This paper argues about the Hate Crimes that happen and who it happens to, but this paper will talk about topic that will go over sexual harassment to the LGBTQ+. The majority of the hate crimes in the military is towards people of the LGBTQ+, women, religion, and people of color have been getting hate crime and not too much has been done to stop or fix it. Further, this paper shows that the military is not enforcing laws of the people how are spreading hate; the military must step up on laws to stop hate crimes in the military.

Presenter Five
Title:
Presenter: Owen Chastain
Biography:
Abstract:

Q and A

ROOM TWO:
Chair: Associate Professor, Brett Terpstra

Presenter One
Title: Origins of serial killers explained by the biopsychosocial model
Presenter: Morgan Engberson
Biography: Morgan is a student at Salt Lake Community College and will be graduating this semester with an associates in psychology. She is involved with the psychology and Psi Beta club at the college. She will continue her journey in the fall at Arizona State University’s New College of Disciplinary Arts and Sciences studying forensic psychology. She plans on obtaining a Ph.D. in forensic psychology. Her dream is to work for the FBI in the behavioral analysis unit. Her academic passions include studying crime and psychology.
Abstract: How does an individual become a serial killer? Is it something they are born with or is it something that happens over time? The answer is yes, both are possible. This presentation will dive deeper into how an individual becomes a serial killer based on the biopsychosocial model. This will explain how one’s biological makeup, psychology, and socio-environmental factors can lead to a person committing such horrific crimes. Each of the three aspects of the model will be broken down into what the terms mean and how it can explain the connection to a serial killer’s behavior.

Presenter Two
Title: Exploring Family Instability Disparities in the United States
Presenter: Billie Herrera
Biography: Billie Herrera is a student at Salt Lake Community College majoring in psychology. Her desired career field is still undecided, but she still hopes to get a bachelor’s degree. Billie grew up in West Valley City, Utah. In her free time she enjoys traveling with family and playing video games with friends.
Abstract: This paper is an investigation into the gaps of experiences relating to family instability in different groups within the United States. Family instability can have different causes, such as race, socioeconomic status, where you live, or other demographic variables. It will highlight the unequal distribution or treatment of family instability among us and focus on understanding and addressing these issues.

Presenter Three
Title: Pedophilia?
Presenter: Joseph Johnsen
Biography: I am a student at Salt Lake Community College, seeking to achieve a Business Associates
of Science. I plan to move on to receive a bachelor degree in Business Finance. I would like to
go on to receive an MBA at Harvard Business School, or at Colombia University. An interest in
Commercial Real Estate Development was inspired by my father, who works in that field. After
completing graduate school, I would like to work Real Estate Development company besides my
fathers, but after some time, find my way back to his. In my mean time, I enjoy spending time
with friends and family, being outdoors, and playing pool.
Abstract:

Presenter Four
Title: Anti LGBTQ+ Legislation & Transgender Bathrooms
Presenter: Davis Jordan
Biography: Davis Jordan is a student currently attending Salt Lake Community College, with an emphasis on Business. He hopes to transfer to the University of Utah. Davis was born in State College,
Pennsylvania to two graduate students attending Penn State at the time. He moved to Salt Lake
City at 18 months (about 1 and a half years) old, where he has lived ever since. He loves to
skateboard, climb, read, and do many outdoor activities.
Abstract: This paper focuses on the Anti LGBTQ+ legislation being passed in the United States of
America. This paper specifically focuses on the bathroom bills being passed throughout the
country, Utah included, that enforce transgender people to use the bathroom of the sex they were
assigned at birth. This paper aims to understand and digest the legislation being passed and to
further educate the reader on the battle between the government and those of the LGBTQ+
community.

Presenter Five
Title: Sexual Assault on College Campuses
Presenter: Tristin Malouf
Biography: Tristin Malouf is a 18-year-old student from Salt Lake City, Utah. She graduated from Skyline
High School and is currently attending Salt Lake Community College majoring in business. She
plans to transfer to the University of Notre Dame and graduate with a bachelors in business
marketing and management. She wants to have a career as a marketing manager or a real estate
agent. Currently she is employed as a Lifeguard shift lead at Holladay Lions Recreational Center.
Along with working she loves dancing, singing, surfing, and skiing.
Abstract: Sexual assault has become a huge issue in the United States, especially on our college campuses. So many women have been assaulted on campus however many do not report it in fear nobody will believe them. In official reports there are so many victims of sexual assault, and it’s not
counting the unfilled reports. There are institutions that fail to file the reports correctly for these
assaults, which results in these women and men to not come back to their school. These assaults
can happen often due to peer pressure or when under the influence of substances such as: alcohol
and drugs. Only one person out of five actually report to the police that they were sexually
assaulted. There are various effects that sexual assault can cause, including: anxiety, post-traumatic
stress disorder, psychological trauma, and even depression. We need to make an effort to help these
survivors and prevent the assault from happening in the first place. Nobody should have to go
through this, especially not alone.

Q and A

ROOM THREE:
Chair: Professor David Robles

Presenter One
Title:
Presenter: Alexis Maurice
Biography: Alexis Maurice is a student at Salt Lake Community College. She has her associate in criminal justice and is finishing her general education. Currently, she works at SLCC as a secretary, lab aide, and teacher assistant for Professor Hoffman at Miller Campus. One of her career goals is to become a forensic scientist. She has presented research at the IAI conference and won the student poster competition in the summer of 2022. Outside of school she loves to rock climb, practice yoga, play games, and rollerblade.
Abstract: Deviance is in all of us, but it varies from person to person. Juveniles are people under the age of 18 that commit a criminal act. So why do some children or teenagers commit more serious crimes than others. This presentation goes into different theories, case studies, and research to try to answer the question as to why some criminal behaviors are more serious in some children or teenagers than others? This presentation also includes alternatives to helping juveniles be successful in the future.

Presenter Two
Title: Looking at Porn through a Criminology Lens
Presenter: Danielle Quering
Biography: Danielle goes by Hope, she is a wife and mother of three. She grew up and went to grade school in the entertainment capital of the world. Growing up in Las Vegas, NV has a way of jading you and normalizing commercial sex. She researches the many facets of human trafficking and speaks on preventative measures that communities can take. She currently attends Salt Lake Community College and is working towards a major in the criminology field.
Abstract: During this presentation the topic of pornography and its impacts will be briefly examined. What is revenge porn? What is commercial sex? Why isn’t the porn industry unionized? Is the First Amendment contributing to human trafficking? What can we do to prevent people’s human rights from being taken from them?

Presenter Three
Title: Perceived Financial Threat and Fear of Financial Crime
Presenter: Liz Homez, Weber State University
Biography: Liz Homez is currently pursuing a master’s degree in criminal justice at Weber State University. She received her bachelor’s degree in crime scene investigation from Weber State, and she decided to further her education to gain the skills and knowledge to address the pressing issues affecting our contemporary criminal justice system. Liz has an interest in criminal justice policy and advocacy, and she enjoys research as well as understanding gaps in said research. Outside of school, Liz spends her time reading books, hanging out with friends and family, exploring new places, and practicing self-care.
Abstract: The current study examines the relationship between perceived financial threat and fear of financial crime. Fear of crime has received substantial attention in the criminological literature; however, only a limited number of empirical studies are available on fear of financial crime. Also, most existing studies that measured fear of crime have relied upon young adult samples from colleges. As financial crime victimization has become an essential area of research, more empirical studies into the fear of financial crime among the general public are needed. Using an online American fear survey from a market research firm, results indicate that perceived financial threat was positively associated with fear of financial crime among participants. Limitations and future studies are discussed.

Presenter Four
Title: ADHD in the Criminal Justice System
Presenter: Harley McCall
Biography: Harley McCall is a former employee and alumni of Salt Lake Community College. She worked at the South City Campus for over two years and received her Associate’s degree in 2022. Her lifelong love of forensic science led to an interest in criminal justice, and she’s especially passionate about making the CJ system more equitable for people with disabilities and mental illnesses. Outside of her job in civil rights, she enjoys spending time with her partner and their cats, thrift shopping, and eating. A quote she likes is, “Remember who the real enemy is.” (The Hunger Games).
Abstract: ADHD is an understudied and misrepresented mental disorder, and criminally (haha) misunderstood and underdiagnosed in the context of criminal justice. The disrespect that people with ADHD receive from the criminal justice system is a crime in and of itself. This presentation aims to educate people on the prevalence of ADHD within the criminal justice system, how ADHD can make moving through and exiting the system very difficult, and explain why the current justice system is not set up to properly serve people with ADHD.

Presenter Five
Title: Understanding Equity Challenges Faced by Incarcerated Transgender Individuals: Analyzing State Statutes and their Practice Implications
Presenter: Samuel Owens and Dr. Douglas Routh, Weber State University
Biography: Samuel has a bachelor’s degree in Criminology, a Minor in Justice Studies, and a Certificate in Diversity and Stratification from the University of Idaho. He is currently working on his Master’s degree in Criminal Justice at Weber State University. His passion lies in exploring Queer Criminology and Corrections, driven by a desire to promote equitable treatment within the criminal justice system. With aspirations of obtaining a Ph.D. in Criminal Justice, Samuel envisions himself as a future professor, eager to impart his expertise and enthusiasm to the next generation of criminal justice professionals.
Abstract: Incarcerated transgender individuals have been a challenge for prison staff to understand, classify, house, keep safe, and treat appropriately for decades. These different challenges have led to wrongful placement, high victimization, and healthcare needs not being met. We build off a prior statutory analysis in several ways: 1. We update state statutes, 2. Reassess statutes for their wording pertaining to housing, classification, victimization and safety, and healthcare options, and 3. Assessing if states have changed their policies to be more in line with state policy over the past few years. Further policy results and implications will be discussed.

Q and A

LUNCH
Room:
12:25pm to 12:50pm
Facilitated by: Casandra Drollinger
Pizza and there will be Vegan Options and Soda and Juice (For Free)

AWARDS
Room:
12:40pm to 12:50pm

Recognizing the Outstanding Criminal Justice Awards

Chairpeople: Professor Stephanie Hoffman and Professor David Robles, Salt Lake Community College

Outstanding Academic Achievement:

This biannual award is for a graduating criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community College that has the highest GPA overall. This award is an objective award that does not have a nomination process and is determined by comparing all GPAs of criminal justice student majors that are graduating that academic semester.

Outstanding Inclusivity and Equity Achievement: 

This biannual award is for a criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community College that has an active commitment and engagement in direct advocacy toward justice, equity, and inclusion of a marginalized segment of society such as, but not limited to, People of Color, immigrants, LGBTQ+, people with disabilities, those incarcerated, women, youth, survivors, unsheltered, economically disadvantaged people, nonhuman animals, and the environment. We recognize that oppression exists, and that action needs to be taken to address inequity and injustices in society.

Outstanding Service Achievement:

This biannual award is for a criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community College that has an active commitment and engagement in serving voluntarily, and not as a paid job or internship, within the community at a government agency or social service nonprofit organization that is not religiously, or political party affiliated. Serving others and the community is a central part of justice and a healthy community.

Outstanding Health and Wellbeing Achievement:

This biannual award is for a criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community College that has an active commitment and engagement in personal fitness, health, and mental wellbeing. We want to support students and not shame students for taking care of themselves over academics. As schools have led to a high rate of student anxiety, depression, unhealthy dietary and physical habits, and suicide. Further, the field of criminal justice has fostered similar habits too. This person must regularly demonstrate in their personal life selfcare, such as, but not limited, exercising, involvement in organized athletic competitions, eating healthy, and seeking out counseling and advising.

Outstanding Rise Up Achievement:

This biannual award is for a criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community that has succeed against many personal social adversities, such as death in the family, unsheltered, drug use, incarceration, domestic violence, or theft.

Outstanding Scholarship Achievement Award:

This biannual award is for a criminal justice student at Salt Lake Community that engages in research, scholarship, organizing academic publications and events, and participates in furthering their knowledge, education, and learning through reading, writing, attending forums, clubs, organization, and watching films.

SESSION THREE
1:00pm -1:40pm

POSTER SESSION
Hall

Poster Title:
Presenter:
Abstract:
Biography:

ROOM FOUR (Forensic Sciences): Innocence Projects: The Devastating Implications of Wrongful Convictions [1:00pm-1:40pm]
Chair: Stephanie L. Hoffman, Assistant Professor, Salt Lake Community College (SLCC)

Presenter One [1:00pm-1:15pm]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Korey Wise
Presenter: Aja Rytting
Biography: Aja Rytting is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Aja aspires to become a Juvenile Correctional Counselor and intends to transfer to UC Irvine in the Fall of 2025 to complete their B.A. in Criminology, Law, and Society.
Abstract: Korey Wise was wrongfully convicted of first-degree sexual abuse, riot, and assault, and was sentenced to 5-15 years on December 11, 1990, in New York. They served 11.5 years due to the following contributing causes: the stigma surrounding crack cocaine, racism, the media, the police, a poor investigation, the prosecution, and Wise’s disabilities. Thankfully they were exonerated by the real perpetrator, Matias Reyes, coming forward years later. This case teaches us the impact on how media can affect a case, while also shining a light on how brutal and unofficial police tactics have placed innocent people in the prison system. After learning about Wise’s story, we see the heart wrenching affects systemic racism has had on young men of color and see the importance of bringing these issues to an end.

Presenter Two [1:20pm-1:35pm]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Earl Washington
Presenter: Kennedi Leon
Biography: Kennedi Leon is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Kennedi aspires to become a Crime Scene Investigator and intends to transfer to Weber State University or Utah Valley University (UVU) next summer to complete their B.S. in Forensics Science.
Abstract: Earl Washington was wrongfully convicted of capital murder and capital rape and was sentenced to death on January 20th, 1984 in Virginia. They served 17 years due to the following contributing causes: officers, commonwealth, lawyer, lack of testing, and misuse of DNA in the courtroom. Thankfully they were exonerated by the use of DNA evidence. Thankfully, the real perpetrator was ultimately identified. This case is vital in showing the relevance of continuous research within the field of forensics and ethical ways to interrogate those who are more susceptible to influence due to lower IQs.

*Q and A after each 15 min. student presentation

1:40pm – 1:45pm – Break

SESSION FOUR
1:45pm -2:50pm

ROOM ONE (Forensic Sciences): Innocence Projects: The Devastating Implications of Wrongful Convictions [1:40pm-2:55pm]
Chair: Associate Professor, Chris Bertram

Presenter One [1:40pm-1:55pm]
Title:
Presenter: Jackson Webb
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Two [2:00pm-2:15pm]
Title: Innocence Project Case: James Calvin Tillman
Presenter: Kenzie Bennet
Biography: Kenzie Bennet is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Kenzie aspires to become a Public Defense Attorney and intends to transfer to Northern Arizona University or Utah Tech University next semester to complete their B.S. in Criminal Justice.
Abstract: James Calvin Tillman was wrongfully convicted of sexual assault, kidnapping, robbery, and rape. He was sentenced to 45 years in prison on September 19, 1989 in Connecticut. Tillman served 16 years due to an eyewitness wrongfully identifying and pointing out James, as well as a DNA test that had no direct lead to Tillman. Thankfully they were exonerated by more advanced technology accurately leading the DNA evidence to the correct perpetrator. It is important to find the correct perpetrator in any crime to prevent wrongful convictions and sending innocent people to jail or prison, it is also important to find our perpetrator because if we lock up somebody else instead, the real suspect will continue to offend and the wrongfully convicted individual now has their freedom stolen from them.

Presenter Three [2:20pm-2:35pm]
Title: Innocence Project Case: Barry Gibbs
Presenter: Ke’ha Maldonado
Biography: Ke’ha is a Criminal Justice Major in their sophomore year at Salt Lake Community College (SLCC). Ke’ha aspires to become a Military SVC and intends to transfer to the University of Utah next summer to complete their B.S. in Political Science
Abstract: Barry Gibbs was wrongfully convicted of 2nd degree murder and was sentenced to 25 years to life on 03/25/1988 in New York City, New York. He served 17 Years due to the following contributing causes: intentional eyewitness misidentification, witness tampering, government misconduct, fraudulent testimony from informants, law enforcement incompetence, police/mafia conspiracy, and ineffective assistance of counsel. Thankfully he was exonerated by the Innocence Project through proof of law enforcement corruption and exculpatory evidence from the alleged eyewitness. The real perpetrator has yet to be identified. It is important to learn about cases such as this because it could happen to anyone. We must ensure we vet sworn officers going forward and have competent and thorough investigations to prevent wrongful convictions.

*Q and A after each 15 min. student presentation

ROOM THREE:
Chair: Professor David Robles

Presenter One
Title: The Perception of Good and Evil
Presenter: Seth M. Johnson
Biography: Seth Johnson. That’s his name. His grandpa, when asked “How are you doing?” would always say, “I’m fat and happy.” Seth is only one of those, and being that he’s a picky eater… Well you get it. Seth, he’s a first generation college student majoring in psychology, but it’s only to fix his own mental problems first. Who knows if that’s actually possible. He was recently admitted to the University of Utah, and no they didn’t admit him to the psychiatric facilities; not yet at least. We’ll see what happens after his presentation on “Good and Evil”. So without further delay, here’s Seth’s presentation on “Good and Evil”.
Abstract: Does religion today play a factor in the perception of good and evil, if at all? There are many ways to define good and evil; and depending on who you ask, the definition may shift radically. These definitions are highly subjective and contextually based on factors of religion, culture, society, law, and of course, the individual. There are some clear understandings of what is good, and what is evil. Yet, what are the facts in relation to what is good and what is bad? How do we define facts in relation to good and evil when facts always change? This presentation is hopefully going to help define, and possibly unpack, the perceptual essence of good and evil in the world today.

Presenter Two
Title:
Presenter: Morgan Dawson
Biography:
Abstract:

Presenter Three
Title:
Presenter:
Biography:

Presenter Four
Title:
Presenter:
Biography:
Abstract:


Q and A

Break
2:50pm to 2:55pm

Keynote Talk
Room
Chair: Associate Dean, Cecile Delozier, Institute for Public Safety, Salt Lake Community College
2:55pm to 3:30pm
Q and A:
3:30pm to 3:40pm

FRANCINE BARDOLE
Making a DNA Difference

With thirty-plus years in the field of Criminal Justice, Francine Bardole has invested the past twenty years becoming an expert in her field of Crime Scene Investigation and Forensics, educating students and investigators, helping solve cold cases, discovering and implementing a superior tool for collecting DNA, and giving a voice to silent victims. Francine has specialized in the field of Forensic Serology and DNA because she felt having a better understanding would prove to be an asset when working with law enforcement at crime scenes and determining probative evidence. With her desire to help solve cases, Francine opened Cold Case Solutions and Resources where she utilizes the Bardole Method and the M-Vac to extract touch DNA from items of evidence in both cold and new cases.

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