Contributors


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from education to incarceration coverFROM EDUCATION TO INCARCERATION:
DISMANTLING THE SCHOOL TO PRISON PIPELINE
Edited By:
Anthony J. Nocella II, Priya Parmar, and David Stovall

COMING SOON IN 2014

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Peter Lang Publishing Book Page

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Contributors’ Biographies

  • Mumia Abu-Jamal is an African American writer and journalist, author of six books and hundreds of columns and articles, who has spent the past thirty years on Pennsylvania’s death row and now in the general population, wrongfully convicted and sentenced for the murder of Philadelphia Police Officer Daniel Faulkner. His demand for a new trial and freedom is supported by heads of state, Nobel laureates, distinguished human rights organizations, scholars, religious leaders, artists, and scientists.

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  • Deanna Adams is a Ph.D. candidate in Special Education, Disability Studies, and Women and Gender Studies at Syracuse University in New York. She is currently an Instructor in Special Education at National-Louis University in Chicago, as well as Syracuse University.  Her interests are in the critical study of special education, as well as the school to prison pipeline, the overrepresentation of kids of color in special education, and the support of LGBTQ students in schools. She is currently doing research on school-wide behavior management. Deanna has been a teacher in special education in both public schools and correctional facilities for boys in New York State.

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  • Deborah Appleman is the Hollis L. Caswell Professor and chair of educational studies at Carleton College. Professor Appleman’s recent research has focused on teaching college-level writing and literature courses at a high security correctional facility for men. She is the author of Reading Better, Reading Smarter: Adolescent Literacy and the Teaching of Reading; Reading for Themselves: How to Transform Adolescents into Lifelong Readers Through Out-of-Class Book Clubs; Teaching Literature to Adolescents; Critical Encounters in High School English: Teaching Literary Theory to Adolescents (winner of the Richard A. Meade Award); and Braided Lives: An Anthology of Multicultural American Writing.

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  • Four Arrows, aka Don Trent Jacobs, Ph.D., Ed.D., is author of Teaching Truly: A Curriculum to Indigenize Mainstream Education (2013); editor of Unlearning the Language of Conquest (2006), and co-author with Greg Cajete and John Lee of Critical Neurophilosophy and Indigenous Wisdom (2009) among other acclaimed books. He is currently a faculty member in the College of Educational Leadership and Change at Fielding Graduate University. He was named by AERO one of twenty-seven visionary educators for their book, Turning Points, and is recipient of the Martin Springer Institute for Holocaust Studies 2004 Moral Courage Award.

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  • William Ayers, formerly Distinguished Professor of Education and Senior University Scholar at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), has written extensively about social justice and democracy, education and the cultural contexts of schooling, and teaching as an essentially intellectual, ethical, and political enterprise. His books include A Kind and Just Parent; Teaching Toward Freedom; Fugitive Days: A Memoir; On the Side of the Child; Teaching the Personal and the Political; To Teach: The Journey, in Comics; Teaching Toward Democracy; and Race Course: Against White Supremacy.

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  • Letitia Basford, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Education at Hamline University. Her teaching and research interests focus on students’ equitable access to education, with a focus on culturally responsive and reform-based pedagogy.  Her work has been published in the Review of Research in Education, Journal of School Choice, Journal of Southeast Asian American Education and Asian Advancement, and elsewhere.  Prior to joining the faculty at Hamline University, Letitia was a coordinator of a teen parent center and a middle school English as a Second Language teacher in California.

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  • Bridget Borer, who is from the Midwest region of the United States, is a single mother of two mixed race (European and African American) adult sons, one of whom is currently incarcerated in a federal prison.  She is also a graduate student studying for her master’s in ESL at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, as well as her ABE licensure for the state of Minnesota.  She is currently working as an English language instructor at a university in Guangdong, China.

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  • Zeke Caligiuri is an accomplished writer of non-fiction, fiction, and poetry. He has won first prize in the PEN writing awards for memoir and has also won writing awards for his poetry. He has spent much of his time trying to rebuild injured family structure through education and self-reflection. He is currently working on his Bachelor of Arts Degree in sociology and has taken part in several writing collectives during his incarceration. He has recently written a full-length memoir about growing up in South Minneapolis. He writes from outside stereotypes to communicate themes of loss, regret, and the effects of isolation in prisoners and their families. He hopes to help change social perceptions about the redemptive value of the individual.

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  • Annette Fuentes is the author of Lockdown High: When the Schoolhouse Becomes a Jailhouse (Verso, 2011), an investigation into the myths and realities of school violence and the harsh disciplinary codes and policing that are undermining public schools’ mission to educate. Fuentes has been a reporter, editor, and opinion writer for newspapers, magazines, and online outlets, writing about education, health care, and social welfare issues. From 1998 to 2006, she taught news reporting at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Journalism. Her chapter is adapted from her book.

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  • Bernardine Dohrn, academic, activist, and children’s rights advocate, is retired Clinical Associate Professor and was founding director of the Children and Family Justice Center of Northwestern University School of Law, Bluhm Legal Clinic. She is author and co-editor of three books: Race Course: Against White Supremacy (co-authored with William Ayers) (2009), A Century of Juvenile Justice (2001), and Resisting Zero Tolerance:  A Handbook for Parents, Teachers and Students (2000). Dohrn serves on the boards of the Burns Institute, the Campaign for the Fair Sentencing of Youth, the Advisory Board of the Children’s Rights Division of Human Rights Watch, the Midwest Human Rights Coalition, and the Kovler Center for the Victims of Torture.

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  • Stephanie S. Franklin, Esq., is the Founder, President, & CEO of Mecca’s Place, Inc., an organization that provides legal representation to approximately 3,300 children in child welfare proceedings in Maryland. Franklin sits on the Maryland Legislative Subcommittee on Child Abuse and Neglect and other statewide and local child welfare committees.  She has received awards and recognition for her work and is published on issues pertaining to the intersection of child welfare and criminal justice.  Franklin will be published in the Freedom Center Journal in the spring of 2014 on her work with black girls.

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  • Henry A. Giroux holds the Global TV Network Chair Professor at McMaster University and is a Distinguished Visiting Professor at Ryerson University. His most recent books include Twilight of the Social: Resurgent Publics in the Age of Disposability (Paradigm 2012), Disposable Youth: Racialized Memories and the Culture of Cruelty (Routledge 2012), Youth in Revolt: Reclaiming a Democratic Future (Paradigm 2013), and The Educational Deficit and the War on Youth (Monthly Review Press, 2013); America’s Disimagination Machine (City Lights) and Higher Education After Neoliberalism (Haymarket) will be published in 2014. His Web site is www.henryagiroux.com.

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  • Nancy A. Heitzeg, Ph.D., is a Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Critical Studies of Race/Ethnicity Program at St. Catherine University, St. Paul, Minnesota. Professor Heitzeg has written and presented widely on issues of race, class, gender, and social control, with attention to the school to prison pipeline and the prison industrial complex. Professor Heitzeg is co-editor of an online series, Criminal InJustice, devoted to encouraging public education, dialogue, and action on issues of mass criminalization and incarceration.

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  • Frank Hernandez is an Associate Professor and Dean of the College of Education at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin. His research interests include the intersection of identity and school leadership, equity and social justice, the principalship, and Latinos and school leadership. His research has been published in journals such as Educational Administrative Quarterly, Journal of School Leadership, and Education and the Urban Society. During his fifteen years in public education, Dr. Hernandez has served as a classroom teacher, an assistant principal, a principal, and a district coordinator of multicultural programming throughout several Midwestern urban school districts.

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  • Daniel White Hodge, Ph.D., is the Director of the Center for Youth Ministry Studies and Assistant Professor of Youth Ministry at North Park University in Chicago. His research and community engagement explore the intersections of faith, critical race theory, justice, Hip Hop culture, and youth culture. His two books are Heaven Has a Ghetto: The Missiological Gospel & Theology of Tupac Amaru Shakur (VDM 2009) and The Soul of Hip Hop: Rimbs, Timbs, & a Cultural Theology (IVP 2010). He is currently working on a book titled The Hostile Gospel: Finding Religion in the Post Soul Theology of Hip Hop (Brill, late 2013).(UPDATE?)

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  • Emilio Lacques-Zapien is a Youth Organizer with the Youth Justice Coalition. He works primarily on movement building, ending police violence and terrorism against communities of color, and re-directing suppression funding in L.A. County back to youth development. Emilio has a hunger and passion for immigrant rights and freedom fueled by the experiences of his undocumented family members from Michoacan, Mexico. He hopes to one day open a youth center in Mid-City Los Angeles modeled after the YJC that also focuses on recreation and sports, art and theatre, social justice, and anti-capitalist collectivist living practices.

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  • Nekima Levy-Pounds is a professor of law at the University of St. Thomas School of Law in Minneapolis and the Director of the Community Justice Project, a civil rights legal clinic. Levy-Pounds trains law students to use the law as a tool to advance the cause of justice on behalf of poor communities of color. Levy-Pounds is also the author of numerous scholarly articles focusing on issues at the intersection of race, poverty, public education, juvenile justice, and the criminal justice system.

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  • Joe Lewis, Ph.D., is an assistant professor in the School of Education at Hamline University.  He specializes in English Language Arts education and serves as an educational consultant for the Image Project, an NGO that works to empower Maasai women and girls in Tanzania.  He began his teaching career in 1991 as a small-town English teacher in Slinger, Wisconsin.  Since then, he has taught secondary and university level English and English education in Milwaukee, Morocco, and New York City.  His areas of scholarly interest and writing include cross-cultural language and literacy practices (specifically in Morocco and Tanzania); critical and postcolonial forms of ethnography; and, most recently, the school to prison pipeline.

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  • Jesselyn McCurdy is a Senior Legislative Counsel in the Washington Legislative Office (WLO) of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU).  As a Legislative Counsel, she lobbies the administration and Congress for fair and rationale criminal justice policy. Jesselyn worked for the ACLU/WLO office for five years before joining the staff of the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, and Homeland Security in 2008. She was the lead House Counsel for the historic Fair Sentencing Act of 2010. Jesselyn received a B.A. in Journalism and Political Science from Rutgers University and her J.D. from Catholic University of America.

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  • Erica R. Meiners teaches and learns in Chicago. She has written about her ongoing labor and learning in anti-militarization campaigns, educational justice struggles, prison abolition and reform movements, and queer and immigrant rights organizing in Flaunt It! Queers Organizing for Public Education and Justice (2009, Peter Lang), Right to Be Hostile: Schools, Prisons and the Making of Public Enemies (2007), and articles in Radical Teacher, Meridians, AREA Chicago, and Social Justice.  Her research in the areas of prison/school nexus; gender, access, and technology; community-based research methodologies; and urban education has been supported by the U.S. Department of Education, the Illinois Humanities Council, and the Princeton Woodrow Wilson Public Scholarship Foundation, among others. Follow her work at www.neiu.edu/~ermeiner/.

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  • Leslie Mendoza is a Youth Organizer with the Youth Justice Coalition and recent high school graduate from F.R.E.E L.A. High. Leslie was pushed out of her original high school because of harsh school discipline policies, and she still graduated from high school at the age of 17. Leslie has a brother who is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole. She works to change policies both statewide and locally by testifying in front of decision makers in order to eliminate the school to prison pipeline. Leslie is now working toward becoming a social worker to help young mothers in the prison system.

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  • Anthony J. Nocella II, Ph.D., an intersectional academic-activist, is a Visiting Professor in the School of Education at Hamline University and Senior Fellow of the Dispute Resolution Institute at the Hamline Law School. Dr. Nocella has published more than fifty scholarly articles or book chapters; co-founded eco-ability and critical animal studies; co-founded and is Director of the Institute for Critical Animal Studies; is the editor of the Peace Studies Journal; and has published more than fifteen books. His areas of interest include social justice education, disability studies, Hip Hop, transformative justice, and peace and conflict studies. His Web site is www.anthonynocella.org.

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  • Priya Parmar, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Secondary Education and Program Head of English Education at Brooklyn College–CUNY.  Priya’s scholarly publications center on critical literacies, youth and Hip Hop culture, and other contemporary issues in the field of cultural studies in which economic, political, and social justice issues are addressed.  Priya is the co-founder (with Bryonn Bain) of the Lyrical Minded: Enhancing Literacy Through Popular Culture & Spoken Word Poetry program working with NYC high school teachers and administrators in creating and implementing critical literacy units using popular culture, media literacy, and spoken-word poetry in individual classrooms across the disciplines.

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  • Don C. Sawyer III is currently a faculty member in the department of sociology at Quinnipiac University in Hamden, Connecticut, where he is teaching the university’s first sociology course dedicated to Hip Hop culture. His scholarly focus is on race, urban education, Hip Hop culture, and youth critical media literacy. His research adds to the work of scholars interested in finding solutions to the plight of students of color in failing school districts and aims to center the often silenced voices of urban youth as experts with the ability to understand and articulate their lived experiences.

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  • Kim Socha, Ph.D., is author of Women, Destruction, and the Avant-Garde: A Paradigm for Animal Liberation (Rodopi, 2011) and is a contributing editor to Confronting Animal Exploitation: Grassroots Essays on Liberation and Veganism (McFarland, 2013). She has also published on topics such as Latino/a literature, surrealism, critical animal studies, and composition pedagogy, and she is currently working on a book about secularism and animal liberation. Kim is an English professor and activist for animal liberation and social justice causes. She volunteers with Save the Kids and is on the board of the Animal Rights Coalition and the Institute for Critical Animal Studies.

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  • Damien M. Sojoyner is an Assistant Professor in the Intercollegiate Department of Africana Studies at Scripps College within the Claremont College Consortium. Damien researches the relationship among the public education system, prisons, and the construction of Black masculinity in Southern California. He has written articles in scholarly journals such as Race, Education, and Ethnicity, Transforming Anthropology, and Black California Dreamin’ published by the University of California Press.  Damien is currently finishing his book on the relationships among public education, masculinities, schools, and prisons.

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  • David Stovall, Ph.D., is Associate Professor of Educational Policy Studies and African-American Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Currently his research and community engagement investigates the intersections of Critical Race Theory, school/community relationships, the relationship between education systems and housing markets, youth culture, community organizing, and education.  In addition to his university appointment, he is also a volunteer Social Studies teacher at the Greater Lawndale High School for Social Justice (SOJO).

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  • Anne Burns Thomas is an assistant professor in the Foundations and Social Advocacy Department in the School of Education at SUNY College at Cortland. In addition, she is the coordinator of Cortland’s Urban Recruitment of Educators (C.U.R.E) program, a comprehensive program designed to prepare qualified teachers for work in high need urban schools. A former middle school teacher in Philadelphia, her research interests include the nature of support for new teachers in urban schools, urban teacher education, and teacher research.  Recent publications include “Finding Freedom in Dialectic Inquiry: New Teachers’ Responses to Silencing,” Teachers College Record, April 2009.

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  • Jon Vang is the oldest child of Hmong immigrants from Laos. Being the first generation, he struggled with the clash of cultures, which led him to join gangs and try to live the criminal lifestyle. His choices resulted in eight years spent in the prison system. He used the prison programs for reflection and growth.  Now he uses his skills to create positive change in the community and to change lives. He leads a support group for people who have previously been incarcerated. One of his projects is a social entrepreneurial venture to employ ex-felons.

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  • Maisha T. Winn is the Susan J. Cellmer Chair in English Education in the Department of Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.  She is the author of Girl Time: Literacy, Justice, and the School-to-Prison Pipeline; Writing Instruction in the Culturally Relevant Classroom (with Latrise Johnson); Black Literate Lives: Historical and Contemporary Perspectives; and Writing in Rhythm: Spoken Word Poetry in Urban Classrooms; and has also co-edited Humanizing Research: Decolonizing Qualitative Inquiry with Youth and Communities (with Django Paris) and Education and Incarceration (with Erica R. Meiners).

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